Posts tagged weirdtome

The Iced Coffee Mystery

Americans, you never seize to surprise me. 

After having lived here for about one year I’ve just discovered something new the other week. And I am not making this up, even the Boston Globe reported about it a couple weeks back (see article here).

Btw, if any Americans are reading this, please explain this phenomenon to me. I’d LOVE to understand. Really.

What am I talking about? Let me set this post in context for you first. We are currently experiencing winter, I’m not talking about your average mild winter. I’m talking New England style type of winter, the wind chills are powerful (nicely said), the cold is bitter and the storms are never-ending. It’s February after all. They say a few more blizzards are coming our way.

Baseline: It’s cold. Real cold.

So, what is it that people (everyone except me) drink around here in the morning (or at any given time of day really) and that you will see everywhere, sitting on office desks, in classrooms, on construction sites, EVERYWHERE?

Iced coffee. With LOTS of ice cubes.

Yap. I am not exaggerating here. It is freezing cold but still a big part of the population deems it to be a good choice of drink. Why?

I tried to understand.

Is it the taste? Is it the fact that you can immediately start drinking it and don’t have to wait until it’s cooled off? Is it that your body doesn’t even care about the cold anymore (because you’ve evolved into a real Northeasterner with immunity to cold) ? I’d LOVE TO KNOW.

Dunkin’ Donuts (of course) also did a little study about this phenomenon back in 2011, check out their insights here.

Are there any interesting food or drink habits you see around where you live? Let me know.

Have a lovely day, wherever you are.

And whatever drinks you choose to go for, you DO YOU.

Photo Credit: SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF

On Living In Halloween Central

Hi friends,

it’s going to be Halloween next week and let me tell you one thing:

People here LOVE Halloween.

Tell me something new Sandra you’re thinking. I know. Still, we have to talk about it, since it’s my first time experiencing the whole thing in the US. You can book graveyard ghost tours, pirate harbor cruises or go to Halloween pub crawls. Everyone loves to decorate their houses with weird decorations (I saw tombstones people and dog skeletons wearing sports tricots?!) and spiders and I don’t know…is it just the skeptical European in me that doesn’t really get all the hype around the witches, vampires, pumpkins and weird candy stuff related to Halloween?

Still, I volunteered at the Pumpkin Float at the Boston Common last week and went to a Halloween party (one of the many many this weekend). I’ll admit it, I love seeing all the pumpkins on display out in the streets and I get the fun part about it. Which other holiday allows you to dress up as Princess Leia, Eleven from Stranger Things (whoa, seen the new season?), your favorite M&M, as a mermaid or even your favorite action hero or animal?  I see it, I appreciate the creativity in it. But other than that, Halloween doesn’t really appeal to me (other than maybe the fancy limited candy editions in stores, ha).

Anyhow, as I live in a neighborhood that is famous for its decorations I thought I’d take you along for a little stroll. Apparently, it gets super crowded on October 31st, as everyone comes to see the decorations.

What do you think about Halloween? Do you love it? Let me know in the comments below. If you are celebrating, have a happy Halloween everyone!

My Passport And I

My passport and I.

Our relationship has massively changed since I’ve moved to the US.

I’m going to tell you how (if you care that is). It also might change the way you see your own passport. Let us think about that for a second.

If you’re European, you’re living in Europe and reading this, I think you’ll agree with me that you RARELY to NEVER use your passport in daily life. Usually you’ll have your card of identity on you as a means of identification. Your passport, however, will only come out on very special occasions that is when you decide to travel longhaul and go far far away. That’s also why my original association when thinking about my passport back in the day was ADVENTURE, TRAVEL, FUN. It was the times I used to flick through my passport to admire all the stamps I had collected from former travels.

Now that I’m living in the States AND on top of it all in a state that is rather strict in terms of alcohol policy, my passport is my new purse staple that goes EVERYWHERE with me. I see it everday and I hold it in my hands almost everyday. Especially when I go out to a dinner, a bar, a liquor store or to a super market that sells wine and beer.

From seeing each other every couple of months or once or twice a year to almost everyday, my red passport is my constant companion now. There is a concept in social psychology saying that the more you are exposed to a certain object or person you’ll tend to like it more than others you are less exposed to. So in short: I like my passport more than ever, because I think it’s a great little piece of design (way cooler than other passports, have you ever checked others out in the lines at the airport?) and it’s never been more useful if I want to get a glass of good red wine.

Why all that drama?

They will not accept a card of identification. Trying to explain to them that it is an equivalent form of identification. Useless. I’ve once even got a comment when showing my ID (naive me, a few years ago) if I was a member of the Red Cross? Ehm, no.

Oh the funny comments I’ve gotten. The classic, ‘ah Sweden is a nice place’ (People, it is even written on the passport you are holding in your hands that the country is called Switzerland. Come on!) or the requirement to show my passport on the evening of my 30th birthday. No, she didn’t think it was funny to tell her that it was my 30th birthday. She basically didn’t CARE.

Long story to say, appreciate your Swiss passport. It’s a special little thing.

Going Vegan for One Week: An Experiment

Hi gang,

I’ve come up with yet another food related experiment. After 3 weeks of full on food overload (delicious though) with friends and family and many many outings to restaurants, cafés and bakeries and I thought why not try….and going vegan for one week (meaning, besides no meats to eat no dairy products).

So, what happened, you ask? I failed on day 3 (that was two weeks ago). And I must say it was mainly due to the fact that I hadn’t really prepared for it and thought I could just wing it.

Well, no.

I decided to give it another try, put a little more thought into it and went for a big shop on Sunday.

A short excursus here: We went to our regular neighborhood supermarket (still big in comparison to Swiss supermarkets) and not to Whole Foods, which I’m sure would have had more vegan options. Still, “armed” with all the salad items, vegetables, grains, oatmeal, fruit, vegan butter, vegan cheese (ewww) I felt like I could take on this week without a problem.

Still I only passed my vegan experiment by 95%? Read on more about it below!

Breakfast

Breakfast actually was the one meal I found the easiest to do throughout this whole week.

I normally eat porridge for breakfast and even when I’m not doing a vegan experiment, I use almond milk to cook it as I find it delicious and feel like it doesn’t sit too heavy in my stomach either. In short: I had either porridge with almond milk (also bought a chocolate almond milk version to spice things up a little, very delicious), dates and bananas or strawberries. I switched between the porridge and homemade acaï bowl with bananas and granola. Usually accompanied by a herbal lemon or fennel tea. Very delicious.

Lunch

Rich Salads were my go to option for lunch. However, I went to one lunch talk at MIT where I was confronted with their buffet options (grilled meats, cheese platters, … you get the picture. NOT VEGAN.). Let me just say that I was the person eating all the hummus and olives.

Snacks

I mostly ate fruit like grapes, bananas, strawberries, dates or energy and protein bars (I actually kind of developed an obsession for energy bars, more on that topic soon). And dairy-free ice cream by FOMU or Ben & Jerry’s. Other than that, nothing special to report.

Dinner

I discovered a new grain: FARRO (Dinkel for you Swiss and German readers). I love it! So I went for it and made a zucchini risotto. I tried to sprinkle a bit of vegan Mozzarella on it at the end, which I regretted. It just didn’t taste right. Other options were a delicious vegetable curry with rice, lots of chickpeas. I basically must have eaten 5 tins of chickpeas all by myself.

I don’t regret it though. I love me some chickpeas.

Why I Failed

I failed twice to be exact.

AND it was other people’s fault (of course, no but really).

Let me explain. The two times I could actually not keep up the vegan promise (if you want to call it that) was when I was involved in social situations with other people. On Friday for instance, we had a boardgames and pizza evening with our international Harvard friends. I even tried to research vegan pizzas in Cambridge before going out. But a few clicks in, made it clear that the next vegan pizzeria was way too far away, I gave up. I know I know. I just didn’t want to be the special one who had to order a pizza especially made for her.

Second time I gave in was at a baby shower on Sunday. I just wanted to taste some of that beautiful cake, I mean, do you understand what I mean? Weak me. 

Conclusion

I really do admire vegans, as I now understand how much preparation and discipline it must take to really go through with it. Obviously every vegan reading this will shake their heads at my weak (or non existing) discipline.

Could I be a vegan? I consider myself a flexible vegetarian, meaning that I will mostly eat vegetarian 90% of the time, with the odd exceptions of a good and organic piece of meat, cordon bleu or a bit of bacon at breakfast every once in a while. I find that it is way more easy to upkeep a vegetarian lifestyle as you still are allowed to eat honey, eggs, yoghurt and cheese. Foods that I simply love.

The milk and the butter I find rather easy to substitute, while it seems impossible to me to find a good substitute for cheese. I did try a coconutmilk yoghurt but didn’t like it too much. And eggs every once in a while are nice to have for breakfast. This has become more of a ramble than a structured text now.

All to finish off by saying that I find it very important to eat a balanced diet including everything there is (even though I am mostly leaving out meats and fish), while I of course respect everyone’s decision on how to eat the way they want to. I totally understand all of the reasons behind going vegan and again, I admire the determination. Still, I don’t think it’s for me.

Are you vegan or trying to be? Could you picture yourself being one? I’d love to hear your comments below!

American Daily Life Etiquette

Hi friends, how are you today?

The topic we’re about to talk today might be one of my favorites: Daily etiquette.

Meaning as in how you are expected to behave in public space according to the norms of the country and its culture you’re living in. I’ve had an interesting conversation with my international friends about that last week and found it just so interesting that even a seemingly simple act of greeting someone can be interpreted and done SO differently depending on where you live. One of my favorite examples was that in South Korea male friends go walking around the city holding hands, same goes for friends who go out with their female friends. Isn’t that interesting? Or how kissing (or the lack thereof) as a form of greeting is so different in every country?

This is also one that always greatly confuses me as I go on to kiss people on the cheeks three times here and they look at me even more confused (I ALWAYS forget, it’s a reflex, trained over so many years). Swiss people seem to be into kissing.

Anyways, I’ve compiled some of the things that struck me as most different in daily life etiquette as compared to Switzerland. Let’s go! 

The art of sneezing correctly

It’s been cold in winter (very cold), there’s the allergies going on right now (damn you pollen), in conclusion:

People sneeze a lot around here. 

It happens, like anywhere else actually (maybe I’m making too big a deal out of it)  but I find that people are way more considerate when sneezing than in Switzerland. I tell you how it goes: You’re sitting in the T (the Bostonian subway) and someone next to you sneezes into his elbow (important detail, he/she doesn’t just sneeze into the open air, no no). Anyways, what surprised me the most was that people actually apologize and will say something along the lines of “excuse me”, “sorry”. And I’m like?

Whoa, you don’t have to apologize for sneezing but ok.

Holding doors open

This one I find is really nice. Be it in the T stations, in restaurants, the library or anywhere where there aren’t automatic doors, people WILL HOLD THE DOOR for you. YES. Like really. They will wait and hold it open if they see you behind them. That’s a whole other level of politeness as compared to Switzerland (where I at least) find that people tend to do that less. Also, if you hold the door, people will ALWAYS say thank you. ALWAYS.

Excuse me…

Politeness seems to be the red thread throughout this post, doesn’t it? The conclusion being that Americans really try and be very polite (when they’re in public space at least). During rush hours and when the T and busses are super busy and people need to get off, they will always politely say “Excuse me”.

Keep your distance

When two Americans are standing and talking to each other they stay at least 16 inches (aka 40 cm) away from each other (I’ve read that somewhere. How do they find that out in the first place?!), farther away than is customary in many other cultures it seems. An American may feel threatened if you come too close. They should go to a Southern European country, would they like that?

5 Things That Are More Expensive in Switzerland Than In The US

Hello everyone,

I am back! I don’t know if that excites you as much as it does excite me but. I. AM. BACK. Forreals (in normal words: Blogging 5 times a week again).

I’ve had the best three weeks ever and will be sure to report on the many great discoveries and experiences we’ve made over the course of the next days, let me start with this topic today however. You might remember, I had posted about 5 things that actually were more expensive in the US in comparison to Switzerland (yes, such things exist, read about it here if you haven’t already) and thought it was now about time to reverse the spiel again. If you think I’ve missed out on something, do let me know in the comments below.

Gym memberships

While I am surely no expert on this topic as a) I was a lazy slob back in Zurich and had never stepped foot in a gym there and b) because I always thought they were rather expensive when it came to memberships and thus preferred to go run outside.

Well, you surely cannot say that gym memberships are expensive around where we live in the US. For as little as $10 per month you can get access to a totally fine gym in Cambridge, sounds crazy right? I did a bit of research and saw that a comparable gym in Zurich offered a three months membership for CHF 329.-

So here goes your first fun fact: Gyms are more expensive in Switzerland than in the US (or at least where we live in MA).

Going to the movies

While an admission to a movies theatre here in Boston will cost you between $9.75 and $13.99 it will definitely cost you way more in Switzerland (around CHF 19.- upwards, is that still correct? I am an expat, help me). Conclusion: Going to the movies in the US is cheaper than in Switzerland.

Fuelling your car

This one is not an especially interesting one as it is one a lot of people expect but OH MY LORD. How cheap is it to fill your car with gas here? It’s insanely cheap. Here goes a comparison for you (according to the latest stats from Bloomberg):

The average price of a liter of gas in the US in Q1 2017 is $0.68.

The average price of a liter of gas in Switzerland in Q1 2017 is $1.42.

Eating out

I get it, Americans. You generally value convenience and food and therefore like to eat out a lot more than we Europeans do (not based on any scientific evidence, just my feeling). What helps is that eating out generally speaking is not as expensive as in Europe. Obviously this won’t apply to everywhere and any type of restaurants but generally speaking for an easy lunch or dinner at a nice place you will end up spending less I would say. Of course there’s the tip that will add up in the end but still, I find that we also eat out more here than we did in Switzerland.

Do you like to eat out? 

Coffee/Cocktails

Again, I’m sure this won’t apply to any type of drinks and type of locals but generally I would say that besides being more creative with their cocktails they also cost less in the US in comparison to Switzerland. Same goes for the coffee. However, while coffee in the US might often not be as good as in Switzerland it also costs less per cup as it does in Switzerland.

What else do you think is (too) expensive in Switzerland in comparison to other places you’ve travelled?

Have a great week and talk to you tomorrow! Byeee!

Thoughts On Living Abroad

Hi everyone, how are you?

Let’s talk about living abroad today. Everyone knows that you will miss your holidays with your family, having your friends around, eating your favorite childhood foods from your favorite grocery stores. But I thought I’d dig a little deeper than that.

What is amazing about living abroad

I am aware that living abroad for two years is an immense privilege so I take it for what it is: A gift. Usually, when you get a gift (unless you seriously lack of education) you say “thank you”, right? So what is there to be thankful for being an expat and living abroad?

  • Besides the obvious (cliché but true) stuff like that it widens your horizon, that it forces you to learn new things and be brave (make new friends, strive to master the nuances in a new language) what strikes me as the most important of all is this:
  • The confidence you gain with yourself when you go to this new place and start all over again from zero on and the knowledge that you can rely on yourself to build a life again. That is quite a reassuring and good feeling, right? It really is a new beginning, full of curiosity and excitement. You have to figure out how basic things work in your new country (from public transportation, applying for a job, how to be good at small talk, shop at grocery stores or how to post letters, the list is endless).
  • A thought I also like is that the mere act of living in another country, in another language, fundamentally changes you. It forces you to rediscover your own personality as you are in a new environment where you have to reposition yourself in (as opposed to your home country where it is pretty clear where you belong, who you are). For example, I feel more comfortable talking to strangers now (not in a bad way, don’t you worry) but in a more being open-minded towards people I don’t know way (it is just considered friendly behavior here and my Swiss shyness seems just dumb). I am already picturing myself back in Zurich talking to people on the streets just because I feel like I want to tell them something and they go like “who dat crazy lady?” (yes, I’ve referenced myself as a a lady, haha).

Being part of an expat* community

Of course we try and meet as many locals as we can. I try doing that by volunteering, where I get in touch with lots of Americans, which I sincerely enjoy. As an expat, however, there seems to be this magnetic power to get together with other expats. And we are no exception. So far, we got to meet lot (LOTS) of expats here. It is definitely a hub for people coming together from all over the planet.

I met lovely and super interesting people from Romania, Finland, Brazil, Spain, Canada, Iran, China, Israel, Czech Republic, France, Italy, Turkey, Haiti or Germany to name a few. Even though we couldn’t have more different backgrounds and home countries, there is one thing that unites us: The experience of leaving and starting a new life in a new country. And believe me that is enough to create a link.

Having major FOMO becomes a constant

Besides all of the lovely things starting a life in a new country entails, there is still one question always nagging you in the back of your mind that is “What am I missing at home?”. I think that we manage to keep up to date with everything going on at home pretty well, still one of my biggest fears is going home and finding out that I have missed too many things. Because, let’s be honest: Life goes on without us. I guess there is nothing you can do than trying to stay connected.

Visiting home is wonderful and strange at the same time

As much as I love visiting home I find it is strange at the same time. Except for family and friends (which are obviously great) basic stuff like our apartment or jobs aren’t there anymore. We live a life of a guest in our own home country if feels like.

Anyway, I like how this American experience has shaped me so far, I also love that I get to connect with so many different people at volunteering. This is definitely something I would like to keep up when I get back home to Switzerland (after eating mountains of cervelats and bread first).

BTW: We went to a Swiss Soirée** a couple of days ago (yes, that is what you do when you are a Swiss person living abroad) and you know what? IT WAS AMAZING. It’s crazy how food can catapult you home INSTANTLY even though it’s more than 6000 km away (unfortunately, they didn’t have cervelats at the soirée but they had Salsiz and Bündnerfleisch, WIN!).

*Disclaimer: Even though I am not particularly fond of the word “expat” as I don’t see how I am really different from a “regular” immigrant, I’ll still use it.

**I had a fancy alcoholic drink with a little white cross in it (see photo above) and it tasted FABULOUS. 

American Daily Life: 5 Things That Still Surprise Me

Hey gang! What’s up?

Hope you’ve had a fabulous weekend!

After the last two weeks of steering away a bit of the American posts and focussing more on wellbeing and living related topics, I’ve had a little think about the future mix of topics around here.

I’ve decided to post about American life, wellbeing and living each once a week, paired with two random ones. What do you reckon? Do you prefer themed weeks? (Or do you not care at all, also legit). Any suggestions and recommendations are warmly welcome. Don’t be shy!

Ok, so let’s get started with today’s post.

Even though I’ve been living in the US for four months now, there are still new things that keep surprising me every day (I’ve written about weird things that I needed to get used to here and here as well, if you want to read more about weird American things as seen from a very eurocentric European’s point of view, haha).

#1 Scented Trash Bags

Seriously, this made me lol the first time I realized it is completely normal to buy and have scented trash bags. Yes, (you Swiss reader you, reading this), this is a thing.

You’ve always wanted your trash bags to smell like Vanilla Flower, Hawaiian Aloha (what is this even?), Lavender and Sweet Vanilla, Citrus or Odor Control Lemon, didn’t you? If the answer is yes, this is your country.

Still, I can’t understand the whole deal about them. We have lemon scented trash bags (Philipp bought those by accident) and they really don’t make no difference at all. The premise is that they control the odor, which I cannot really confirm. Anyhow, funny stuff.

#2 Post your outgoing mail in your house

That is actually a good one that really surprised me the first time I found out.

You can actually post your outgoing mail IN your building (YES, in your building. You don’t even have to leave your building to go find a mailbox to post your letters). The postman who actually has access to every building just opens a box next to the people’s mailboxes and takes them with him when he leaves.

Amazing, isn’t it?

#3 Where’s my cervelat at?

So if you know me, you know that I barely eat meat, especially not in the US. However, I’ve had a HUGE (HUGE) craving for cervelats and something called Bündnerfleisch lately. Random I know. Sadly, people here do not seem to enjoy cured meats or (good) sausages. They even seem proud to put on almost any package that the meat hasn’t been cured (when that is actually the part I love the most). I might visit the wrong grocery stores and am happy to get any recommendations you might have in that department for us.

My big hope is tonight. I might, if we’re lucky, eat a cervelat at the Swiss Soirée (an event organized by the Swiss Society in Boston, fingers crossed).

Rösti, Raclette (and hopefully cervelat), I’m coming for you.

#4 Addresses And Dates = Confusion

So, this confuses me greatly. If you’ve grown up learning to write addresses and dates in a certain way it is seriously challenging to adapt to the American way of writing them.

Every time I have to write down an address or date, be it on a personal letter, envelope or on a form, I seriously have to think about it (more) twice (embarrassing but true).

While I kind of get the address system, the date system I don’t.

Looking at a date such as 09/31/2017 just makes my brain go, wait what?

#5 Toaster Waffles

There is a thing such as frozen waffles that you can just put in your toaster and eat = MIND BLOWN.

Have a lovely week friends!

3 Thoughts On Trying To Be A More Minimalist Consumer

Hello!

A quick note before we start. I’ve revamped my notification emails, so don’t be surprised if today’s mail looks different than the ones before*. They look definitely better than the ones before (no offense WordPress but those mail notifications are super ugly). The frequency of the newsletter will also be different. As opposed to every day from Monday to Friday, I will spare you the spam and will only send you a mail with kind of a resume of the week and my personal highlights (if I dare say so) on Fridays. Sound good? Then enter that box on Home (here) and subscribe to the newsletter. Also, if anyone has a suggestion for an alternative word to newsletter (it sounds sooooo bad), do let me know. It would be much appreciated.

Ok, so the self-promotion part is over now. Let’s get to the real content.

Living in the US, even if it only has been for a couple of months, has made me realize how consumerism really is a main pillar of American culture. You can purchase basically everything everywhere (and online as well) at any hour of the day to be delivered to your door the next day, using up all those coupons and deals and special offers you have at hand. Also, advertising is literally EVERYWHERE, calling you to buy.

It made me reflect on my own consumer behavior and when I stumbled across the Minimalists’ practical guide on how to become a minimalist consumer I thought it would be interesting to share the three points that stood out most to me with you guys (check out their original, long blog post here).

  • Adopt a traveler’s mentality of only having what you need. We only take what we need when we travel (because we don’t want to pay that overweight at the check-in, haha). And we’re fine and feel light, right (you’re on a holiday too, so that helps I guess)? The Minimalists claim that adopting a traveler’s mindset provides the same benefits and not only for the duration of a vacation but for a lifetime.
  • Compare down. President Roosevelt once said, “Comparison is the thief of joy.” He was, of course, absolutely right. As we begin comparing our lives and possessions to those around us who have more, we lose joy and happiness. And we begin trying hard to close the gap because we always compare upward—looking at those who have more. Why not break this trap if by taking greater notice of those who need more and start spending time with people who have less.
  • Consider the full cost of your purchases. Usually when you buy something, you only look at the sticker price. But this is rarely the full cost of your purchase. Our purchases always cost us additional time, energy, and focus (cleaning, organizing, maintaining, fixing, replacing, or removing). Making a habit of considering those expenses into our purchases when you’re about to buy something will allow you to make more confident decisions.

While the Minimalists’ premise is to overcome consumerism I wouldn’t go as far as that, my goal is to (just) become a more aware and mindful consumer by taking the points above more into consideration. Still, a beautiful bouquet of fresh tulips is something I want to keep indulging myself with every once in a while.

Have a great weekend everyone, enjoy it to the fullest!

And if you consume anything you might think about those little inputs. Byeeee!

* Stupid me, the moment I published this post I realized I hadn’t deactivated the old subscription notification. Please excuse the double spam today! Won’t happen again.

American Icons: The Marshmellow

Hello people

It’s Friday! It’s the weekend soon! S-W-E-E-T!

What’s also sweet are marshmellows.

Smoothest transition ever.

Even though most of you don’t seem as enthusiastic about my American Icons series as I am (it’s ok though you can’t please everyone) I wanted to look into this food-related icon that the marshmellow really is. It isn’t something Swiss kids grow up with as they do here. Let’s get started!

It all started in Egypt (!) and it originally was used as medicine (!!)

Marshmallow candy originated in ancient Egypt. It was a honey candy that was flavored and thickened with Marsh-Mallow plant sap.

Nineteenth century doctors extracted juice from the marsh mallow plant’s roots and cooked it with egg whites and sugar, then whipped the mixture into a foamy meringue that hardened a bit later, creating a medicinal candy used to soothe children’s sore throats.

Until the mid 1800’s, marshmallow candy was made using the sap of the Marsh-Mallow plant. Gelatin replaces the sap in the modern recipes. It gives the marshmallow its “stable” form. Today’s marshmallows are a mixture of corn syrup or sugar, gelatin, gum arabic and flavoring.

The most iconic American campside fire snack

If there is an equivalent to the famous campside fire snack in Switzerland that are the Cervelat or the Stockbrot it is something sweet here (of course). It’s S’mores! Do you know them? I definitely love them. Check out the recipe here if you want to try and make it on your next excursion (because that is something you do, right?)!

Homemade S’mores with Marshmallows Chocolate and Graham Crackers

Fluff

Another weird thing is Fluff. Funny name. It’s basically a Marshmellow spread. The things people invent. I am not eating it, Philipp is weirdly fascinated by it though. Every time he puts it on toast I give him a disgusted look, which he finds funny.

Fluff

Do you like marshmellows? I’d love to know! Have a fantastic weekend!

A Short Little History Of Cereals

Oh hi there

As consistent as I was with my no sugar challenge last week, we’ll keep the sugar theme running up (you’ll see what I mean in a few seconds) until the end of this week. We’re back to normal next week, I promise.

Today I wanted to talk about cereal.

Something I guess everyone has eaten before.

It is a respectable meal. Not.

Yet I wanted to look a little bit further into its (American) history as it such an American product to me. To “spice” things up a little I will show you the funniest cereal finds I made during a supermarket visit a few days ago. The kids that are given this cereals must be on ONE BIG VEEEERRYY HIGH Sugar High when eating those.

Mid to Late 19th Century

In 1863, James Caleb Jackson, a religiously vegetarian from New York created a breakfast cereal from graham flour dough that was dried and broken into shapes so hard they needed to be soaked in milk overnight. He called it granula. John Harvey Kellogg, a surgeon who ran a spa in Michigan, later made another version and named it granola. 

1900s

Kellogg and his younger brother, Will Keith Kellogg, had figured out how to make a flaked cereal they called Corn Flakes. They added sugar (of course) and began mass-marketing them.

1950s

After World War II, cereal consumption increased with the advent of the baby boom, and sugar became a selling point (of course). Kellogg’s invented Frosted Flakes and its pitchman, Tony the Tiger, and a new era of television advertising began.

Present