Posts in American Life

My Favorite Cafés in Boston/Cambridge

Hi people,

It’s Friday soon and some of us need a coffee especially on a Friday morning to get things started, right?

I LOVE cafés, there’s just something about them. They are a place where you can stop and take in a moment of reflection and of course enjoy a great cup of coffee, tea as well as beautifully made and (even more importantly) deliciously tasting pastries. Oh YES.

Whether you’ll be visiting the area soon or are a local looking for inspiration, I’ve got you covered. What follows  are my favorite café spots so far (granted I haven’t seen ALL of them yet, I’m still researching. But those six have definitely won a special place in my heart, yes yes).

Have a great cup of coffee and take on that day, ok? Enjoy the weekend! I’m off to Zurich for the next 10 days and am looking forward to a wedding of a beautiful friend of mine, SO E-X-C-I-T-E-D. Hard to spell a word out when your that excited. Anyways, all the best and will talk to you next week!

Loyal Nine

Oh, I love this place. All about it. It’s concept mainly is that they use ingredients and create dishes that the settler a few (!) years back would have cooked with. I love Loyal Nine at every time of day, in the morning the café annex next to the restaurant is a lovely option with great coffee and tea as well as great and creative café food. If you want to go all out, I’d recommend you try the Brunch on the weekend (go for the bread pancakes, absolutely delicious) or dinner. Loyal Nine will not disappoint, it’s one of those restaurants where you leave with a happy belly, not feeling overeaten. The drinks are amazing, too. Can you tell that I like Loyal Nine?

Tatte Bakery

I couldn’t do a favorites list without including Tatte. It’s just…Fantastic! Friends and family who came to visit can attest, it’s a pastries heaven for anyone looking for a delicious sweet or savory breakfast. Seriously their display in the morning is just, unbelievable. They have grown quite a bit in the last time and now have various branches all over the city, definitely check them out if you ever wanted to try super delicious chocolat croissants, pecan nut roses, lemon tarts, meringue, halvas, kouign-ammans and the list goes on. They really know their stuff.

Thinking Cup

Thinking Cup seriously convinced me with their coffee in the first place. They use Stumptown Coffee (remember, that was the coffee I drank in New York that I loved so much). It’s actually seriously the best coffee I’ve ever drank, no doubt.

Longfellows

A brewery at night, a coffee shop in the daytime. I love Longfellows if I want to get a productive working morning or afternoon in. It’s a place to get good coffee and get on your laptop. There’s just this peaceful atmosphere that I love. Also, the chairs are #goals!

Pavement Coffee

I especially love the Pavement café on Newbury Street, as it is tucked away a little in the underground and you kind of have to know where it is. Nonetheless, quite a few people know about it, as it is ALWAYS full. But hey, I get it, pretty decors, chill atmosphere and good coffee. Yep, it’s a cool place.

Flour Bakery 

Hands-down the best sandwiches. If you ever feel hungry, check Flour Bakery out. The Harvard graduate Joanne Chang has opened a few branches since opening up her first one here in Harvard Square. And yeah, those sandwiches are just, wow.

What are your favorite cafés in the place you live? Have a fantastic weekend!

How Living In The US Has Changed Me

Hi friends, how are you today?

I have been reflecting lately on how this American experience has changed me (be it small or big things) and wanted to share my thoughts in today’s post.

  1. It made me wear gym leggings in public. And not care about how I look that much anymore. Seriously, I’m not just saying that. It’s true people.
  2. On a more serious note: It changed my understanding of American culture. Even though I had travelled to the US several times before moving here, most preconceptions I had about American culture and daily life came from tv shows (hello Glee), movies and other people’s opinions. Obviously, even though there usually is some grain of truth in there, reality is different (what a surprise). What I’ve encountered and experienced here is that people are incredibly open and friendly. Especially in the first few months after my arrival people I newly met and told about my background were all very supportive and literally everyone would say “Welcome to America”. I don’t know why this simple sentence stuck with me so much but I found it to be such a nice detail. I also thought that if I were to have the same conversation in Switzerland with someone that had recently moved there I would never say “Welcome to Switzerland”. (Maybe I’m just not a friendly person or would you?). What I’m trying to say is that given the international and migrational backgrounds that basically everyone has that you meet here, people tend to be curious and welcoming towards “newcomers”, which is a nice experience. Furthermore, what I found to be even nicer, is how people here are genuinely involved with their community and do a lot of volunteering. Much more than is usual in Switzerland I think. It is regarded a total normality to be engaged in some sort of activity in your community and to spend time volunteering. I really do appreciate this “can do attitude”, where everyone wants to help each other out, at least around here. I think that communal feeling is what has surprised me the most (in a positive way).
  3. It reshaped my values. My generation is seeking in attaining extreme levels of success, notoriety (ha), or success in whatever they do (I know generalizing). Still, there is a constant thirst for more and to be more. While that may sound exaggerating I think that it is somewhat true, we (and I’m not excluding myself) are always looking into ways of further evolving and being successful at what we do. However, when I moved to the US, I was forced to slow down. A lot. I had to sort out all of my paperwork for the work permit, had to figure out this new living situation etc. The far slower pace of my life translated into me putting more time into relationships with friends (and new friends), personal interests and hobbies than into professional prowess, which was something I had never done to that extent when I was working before. As I am now back into the whole application madness, I look back and reconsider that it is important putting enough time aside for your personal interests, friends and family.
  4. It made me more open-minded. This sounds really cliché, but it’s just so true! Living abroad does something incredible: You are exposed to an eclectic bunch of different people and you learn more not only about others and their approach to life but also about yourself. I’m already grateful for the many fantastic people from all over the word that I’ve met, that I’ve had conversations with (even if it was about seemingly small daily life things like what sort of food or shoes are typical for the place they are from). I loved every bit of it. Because it allowed me to learn about people, their experiences and other cultures in such a personal and deep way. Even as a European meeting people from Finland, Sweden, Denmark makes me realize how little we know from each other. Not to mention, all my new friends from China, South Korea, Vietnam or India, which is even more interesting! In short: My change in attitude has been brought about by the people I have met and the friends I have made.
  5. It changed my language skills and ability to communicate When I arrived in the US, I was a confident English speaker I’d say. Still, I found it awkward at times speaking in English (to the extent where I would plan what I would say when I was going into a bakery or government office). Now, I am in a state where I don’t even think about it anymore, I. JUST. TALK. I’ am definitely enjoying speaking English, I sometimes even will drop a word or two in English when speaking to Philipp (and he will be looking at me like ???!!). Just because they seem more fitting to me than the German version of them.

Have you also lived abroad for a while? If so, how did it change you? I’d love to hear!

Have a lovely week!

The Weekend Notes

People!

Hope you’re doing well. Two announcements.

One: This is my post #101, crazy isn’t it? Would love to hear from you if there’s anything you’d like me to write about! Let me know in the comments below (don’t be shy!).

Two: A good friend of mine once mentioned to me that he saves links from interesting stuff he stumbles across on the internet during the week to then read it on the weekends. I found that interesting and tried to do it myself this week, hope you’ll enjoy my eclectic choice of links that I will read up on this Sunday. Have a fantastic weekend yourself!

America

“U.S. life expectancy varies by more than 20 years from county to county” says the headline of this Washington Post article. I’m like whaaaatt? Bookmarked. I’m going to read that. In case you’re into finding out more too, join me.

Another article, this time by the NYT got my attention. It’s a (much needed) fact check on the G.O.P. Health Bill. And yes, I will have to read that in order to not create any alternative facts when discussing it with people around me (get the pun?, maybe it’s a bit far fetched). Thanks NYT!

France

How relieved are we about the French vote? If you want to read up on a little more about last weeks elections, check out this cool and interactive NYT article

My hood (aka Cambridge)

This one goes out to my local friends: The two main source I turn to when I’m in a weekend planning mood and want to know what’s going on around here is The Boston Magazine and the Scout Cambridge.  If you don’t know them yet, check them out, they’ve got great ideas and articles about what to do and see! If you’re just interested in events and the like, there’s the Boston Calendar, which is also great!

Random

The Huffington Post shares some rather interesting news with us: Basketball legend Shaquille O’Neal is running for Sheriff?

Don’t roll your eyes at me. I told you this was the random category.

Nonetheless, I want to know more about it, do you? Read about it here.

The noisy and curious person I am, I like this site ‘My Morning Routine’ a lot. People with all different kinds of backgrounds (athletes, business people, creatives etc.) share their morning routines. Always like to read up on some of them, as I find it interesting and inspiring!

Food

The weekend is not only all about the foods you eat but also about thinking ahead what to make for next week. Two inspirational and trusted sources on this matter are Lucky Peach and Bon Appetit.

Photos, photos, photos

Do you know the feeling, when you get sucked into a world of amazing images that almost make you feel like you are part of them? The Time and the National Geographic sure know they stuff.

What will you be reading up on in the internets this weekend? I’d love to know! Byeee!

My Two NYC Discoveries: The 9/11 Memorial and Calatrava’s Oculus Station

Hi everyone,

I don’t want to bore you with (too many) words today, which is why I’m leaving you with photos of the two buildings/places that by far blew me away the most when I visited New York last time.

It’s the incredibly moving and beautiful 9/11 Memorial and the incredibly modern and minimalist Oculus station by Calatrava, which MUST be the coolest station I have EVER seen (I also would totally not mind if I had to commute there everyday, it’s really such a unique building. Also, I would totally get it why a film director would want to shoot his next sci fi movie here. In conclusion: It’s quite a unique train station.

Have you seen both of this places? If not, I HIGHLY (I’m into CAPS this morning it seems. Sorry. But it’s important) recommend you visit them next time you’re in NYC.

Have a great Thursday, the weekend is near! Yay!

The 9/11 Memorial

The Oculus Station

American Daily Life Etiquette

Hi friends, how are you today?

The topic we’re about to talk today might be one of my favorites: Daily etiquette.

Meaning as in how you are expected to behave in public space according to the norms of the country and its culture you’re living in. I’ve had an interesting conversation with my international friends about that last week and found it just so interesting that even a seemingly simple act of greeting someone can be interpreted and done SO differently depending on where you live. One of my favorite examples was that in South Korea male friends go walking around the city holding hands, same goes for friends who go out with their female friends. Isn’t that interesting? Or how kissing (or the lack thereof) as a form of greeting is so different in every country?

This is also one that always greatly confuses me as I go on to kiss people on the cheeks three times here and they look at me even more confused (I ALWAYS forget, it’s a reflex, trained over so many years). Swiss people seem to be into kissing.

Anyways, I’ve compiled some of the things that struck me as most different in daily life etiquette as compared to Switzerland. Let’s go! 

The art of sneezing correctly

It’s been cold in winter (very cold), there’s the allergies going on right now (damn you pollen), in conclusion:

People sneeze a lot around here. 

It happens, like anywhere else actually (maybe I’m making too big a deal out of it)  but I find that people are way more considerate when sneezing than in Switzerland. I tell you how it goes: You’re sitting in the T (the Bostonian subway) and someone next to you sneezes into his elbow (important detail, he/she doesn’t just sneeze into the open air, no no). Anyways, what surprised me the most was that people actually apologize and will say something along the lines of “excuse me”, “sorry”. And I’m like?

Whoa, you don’t have to apologize for sneezing but ok.

Holding doors open

This one I find is really nice. Be it in the T stations, in restaurants, the library or anywhere where there aren’t automatic doors, people WILL HOLD THE DOOR for you. YES. Like really. They will wait and hold it open if they see you behind them. That’s a whole other level of politeness as compared to Switzerland (where I at least) find that people tend to do that less. Also, if you hold the door, people will ALWAYS say thank you. ALWAYS.

Excuse me…

Politeness seems to be the red thread throughout this post, doesn’t it? The conclusion being that Americans really try and be very polite (when they’re in public space at least). During rush hours and when the T and busses are super busy and people need to get off, they will always politely say “Excuse me”.

Keep your distance

When two Americans are standing and talking to each other they stay at least 16 inches (aka 40 cm) away from each other (I’ve read that somewhere. How do they find that out in the first place?!), farther away than is customary in many other cultures it seems. An American may feel threatened if you come too close. They should go to a Southern European country, would they like that?

American Events: Cinco de Mayo

Happy Cinco de Mayo!

So.

This is a weird one.

Imagine Swiss people would celebrate a battle that one of their neighboring countries had won. And it wasn’t even an “important” one (historians chill out, I mean it wasn’t bringing them independence or anything). I honestly think that Americans just love Mexican food and drinks and found a good enough reason to celebrate this holiday to allow them to eat/drink even more of it on one specific day (and I do totally GET IT, I LOVE MEXICO and its culture and food too). But let me elaborate on the topic a little more.

The facts (for the historians amongst you, otherwise skip to the party ideas below)

What it is: Cinco de Mayo is a holiday that celebrates the date of the Mexican army’s 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War (1861-1867). While the holiday is not that important in Mexico itself (it’s not a federal holiday so offices, banks and stores are still open) it is HUGE in the US where it has evolved into a commemoration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with large Mexican-American populations. Some of the largest festivals are held in LA, Chicago and Houston.

What it isn’t: Many people outside Mexico mistakenly believe that Cinco de Mayo is a celebration of Mexican independence, which is celebrated on September 16.

How to host your own Cinco de Mayo party?

Almost any bar, pub or café here will have a mexican-related drink or food item on offer on the day. Not to mention the craziness going on in Mexican restaurants and eateries. If you’re into Mexican food as much as I am, I’ll help you out with a few starter ideas on how to create and host your own Cinco de Mayo party, ok?

Drinks

If you want to be a little more original and don’t want to opt for a Margarita go for a Paloma instead. It’s a drink that I’ve gotten to know during our travels in Mexico. Here’s how you can do it at home:

Paloma Recipe 

  • Ice
  • 1 1/2 ounces 100 percent agave reposado tequila
  • Juice of 1/2 medium lime
  • Grapefruit-flavored soda (or just a bit of squeezed grapefruit juice in sparkly water) 

Food

I mean. You choose.

Mole Poblano, Tamales, Nachos, Enchiladas, Quesadillas, Tacos, Chilaquiles and the list goes on.

Check out Bon Appétit’s nice overview of recipes here that aren’t all Tacos (even though they are obviously DELICIOUS). Or the ones over at delish.com here, just because the photos will make you HUNGRY.

A must is obviously freshly made Guacamole, check out if there’s a local Mexican shop that sells good homemade tortilla chips to go with it or make them at home by simply cutting up tortillas and roast them in the oven. But obviously for convenience’s sake, buy them.

Music

Without meaning to sound cliché but you should listen to some Mariachi music, which is obviously a classic choice for the event at hand.

You’ll find two of my all time favorites below:

There are plenty of interesting young and (more modern) artists but I somehow love the old songs a lot too. Are you going to celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

 

A Day In Providence (Serious Doughnut Testing Included)

Hi folks,

my dear friends visited two weeks ago and after a couple of days spent in Boston we thought it’d be interesting to leave the state and go discover other places. One of them was Providence, RI.

Easy to reach via train or car from Boston, Providence is the capital of the smallest State of the United States and makes for a nice day trip destination. Home to the renowned creative institution that is the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD for the insiders) and the ivy league school Brown University with its beautiful historic campus, the place boasts with young and creative people.

Last but not least, there’s an amazing A-M-A-Z-I-N-G doughnut place, in case you’re interested in things like that.

Let the photo show commence. Happy Wednesday friends!

Doughnut heaven

Every good day starts with a substantial breakfast, at least in my books. So we went to the one and only option when in Providence, to Knead Doughnuts. They make three different types of doughnut dough. And OH. MY. All of them are very delicious. Try them!

Pretending to be a student at Brown University…

..unfortunately Emma Watson isn’t a student there anymore though. I would have liked to talk with her about the casting choices of the prince in Beauty and The Beast.

Major artsy cool kids alert

All those artsy and cool people at the RISD, too cool for school.

Overall, we’ve had a very nice day and were blessed with beautiful weather (really a blessing, if you live here you’ll know what I mean). What are your favorite day trip destinations where you live?

Happy Wednesday!

A Road Trip Down Cape Cod

Hello everyone,

I know know. Another touristy post today.

But. We went to just too many pretty places and who knows, if you ever come around to visiting the States, you’ll know where to go.

After the day we’d spent in Providence we opted for a second road trip, this time down along the coast with the goal of getting to the famous Cape Cod. Why is it famous? Well, it’s basically THE BEACH people. Who doesn’t like the beach.

Back to the Cape Cod.

The Cape is extending into the Atlantic from the southeastern corner of Massachusetts. Its historic, maritime character and ample beaches attract heavy tourism during the summer months. You’ll find everything, from little fishing villages, towns in the forests, whale spotting on the coast. On the way to our end destination that was Provincetown, we’ve stopped in Plymouth to look at the famous rock the Pilgrims are said to have embarked on when first arriving in the States (VERY disappointing btw, don’t go if you’re thinking about it. It’s. A. SMALL. ROCK. ON. THE. GROUND.). We then made a quick stop in the beautiful little town of Sandwich, where we’ve explored the well-known boardwalk. Absolutely beautiful.

Sandwich Boardwalk 

We’ve had lunch in a little café in the center of Provincetown and were so so super lucky to spot whales on a beach where we went to afterwards. HOW LUCKY ARE WE? Whales are my favorite animals! It was an overall unforgettable day!

 

My NYC Food Guide

Friends!

I went to New York last week and was BLOWN AWAY. Yet again. Like everytime actually. This city is just so powerful in every possible way.

Overwhelming, huge, intense, never boring, exciting, multifaceted, a little intimidating, and the list goes on. How would you describe your experience in New York if you’ve ever visited before? I’d love to know in the comments below.

All of the adjectives listed above actually also apply to a specific field I want to cover today: The food. I once read that you could have dinner every day of your life at a restaurant in NYC and never nearly have seen everything. There are just SO many restaurants and places to get food. Crazy.

In order to help you out a little here (and for my own memory keeping) I thought I’d collect my favorite food spots in NYC, especially the ones I got to try during my last visit around.

Breakfast of dreams

I am a breakfast person. That’s what I am.

It’s a good thing actually. Except when I want to eat everything on a menu. It’s definitely the meal I feel I can eat the most. So.

If you’re into breakfast as much as me and find yourself in the Midtown area, definitely check out Penelope. It’s a beautiful place with a neighboorhoody feel to it and the most MOST delicious French Toast and pancakes ever. The omelettes and eggs were great, too, I was told. I wasn’t too interested in them though, my main focus clearly being on the French Toast and pancakes. Normal. 

If you’re into the whole French bistro ambiance thing gone NYC style, you have to go for brunch at Balthazar.

Is it bad that I got to know about this place because of an actress (hey Mindy Kaling) that once posted a delicious photo of when she visited? The good thing is that it brought me there, right?

Anways, it’s a beautiful place in Soho where I’ve had the best Eggs Florentine of my life (ok, haven’t had that many so far but it was D-E-L-I-C-I-O-U-S). My mouth is watering right now. Did I even tell you that I am trying out to go vegan for this and next week as a little experiment. Already missing those eggs. Not a good sign I guess. Anyways, I’m regressing. If you still want to get your sweet fix but the place is full (reservations highly recommended), fear not, I have a solution for you. They have a little tucked-away bakery (LOVELY) next to the restaurant where you can get the best orangy brioche and pain of chocolat. HEAVENLY.

Coffee Stop

We were lucky enough to stay at the Ace Hotel in Midtown (beautiful hotel) but were even luckier to find out that there was a Stumptown Coffeebar inside the lobby. We obviously had coffee there EVERY DAY as it just was the perfect cup of coffee. I know I know by now you think, woman, relax, don’t get excited as much as that. But it was just so perfect. Please, do me a favor and go to one of the Stumptown places if you’re ever in New York. Ok? Thanks.

Light Lunch Fusion Style

We were walking lots everyday (we were visiting with my parents btw) and after having had good breakfast/brunches we’d rather keep lunches light or skip them after all only to have a little snack in the afternoon so that we could fully enjoy our dinners in the evenings.

A good place to have a light lunch however and that we all loved was Momofuku Nishi. It’s the one Momofuku restaurant that offers Asian cuisine with an Italian twist. Yup. Sounds interesting. Tastes delicious. Try it!

It’s Dinner Time

Oh Oh Oh. The dinners we had. Let me start with the first one.

It’s not a glamorous place, quite the contrary actually. But it’s such a good experience and such an iconic one, too. I’m talking about Katz’s Delicatessen. If you’ve ever been in New York but haven’t visited Katz’s, please do it next time you go and find yourself in the amazing LES. The atmosphere is just so much fun and the food is…well..nourishing! Not suited for vegans though might I add.

Jack’s Wife Freda: Beautiful little spot in West Village with small but delicious menu. GO!

Tacombi: I mean. Who doesn’t love Mexican food? No one, right? Tacombi is an oldie but goodie. I’ve almost always had at least one meal at Tacombi while being in New York. We went to the spot in Nolita and if you try to come a bit earlier than the big crowd (around 6.30 pm) you’ll easily get a table. Oh the food. Pure bliss.

Two other great places worth visiting are Egg Shop and The Butcher’s Daughter! Let me know if you have any other ‘must’ places in NYC, I’d love to hear!

5 Things That Are More Expensive in Switzerland Than In The US

Hello everyone,

I am back! I don’t know if that excites you as much as it does excite me but. I. AM. BACK. Forreals (in normal words: Blogging 5 times a week again).

I’ve had the best three weeks ever and will be sure to report on the many great discoveries and experiences we’ve made over the course of the next days, let me start with this topic today however. You might remember, I had posted about 5 things that actually were more expensive in the US in comparison to Switzerland (yes, such things exist, read about it here if you haven’t already) and thought it was now about time to reverse the spiel again. If you think I’ve missed out on something, do let me know in the comments below.

Gym memberships

While I am surely no expert on this topic as a) I was a lazy slob back in Zurich and had never stepped foot in a gym there and b) because I always thought they were rather expensive when it came to memberships and thus preferred to go run outside.

Well, you surely cannot say that gym memberships are expensive around where we live in the US. For as little as $10 per month you can get access to a totally fine gym in Cambridge, sounds crazy right? I did a bit of research and saw that a comparable gym in Zurich offered a three months membership for CHF 329.-

So here goes your first fun fact: Gyms are more expensive in Switzerland than in the US (or at least where we live in MA).

Going to the movies

While an admission to a movies theatre here in Boston will cost you between $9.75 and $13.99 it will definitely cost you way more in Switzerland (around CHF 19.- upwards, is that still correct? I am an expat, help me). Conclusion: Going to the movies in the US is cheaper than in Switzerland.

Fuelling your car

This one is not an especially interesting one as it is one a lot of people expect but OH MY LORD. How cheap is it to fill your car with gas here? It’s insanely cheap. Here goes a comparison for you (according to the latest stats from Bloomberg):

The average price of a liter of gas in the US in Q1 2017 is $0.68.

The average price of a liter of gas in Switzerland in Q1 2017 is $1.42.

Eating out

I get it, Americans. You generally value convenience and food and therefore like to eat out a lot more than we Europeans do (not based on any scientific evidence, just my feeling). What helps is that eating out generally speaking is not as expensive as in Europe. Obviously this won’t apply to everywhere and any type of restaurants but generally speaking for an easy lunch or dinner at a nice place you will end up spending less I would say. Of course there’s the tip that will add up in the end but still, I find that we also eat out more here than we did in Switzerland.

Do you like to eat out? 

Coffee/Cocktails

Again, I’m sure this won’t apply to any type of drinks and type of locals but generally I would say that besides being more creative with their cocktails they also cost less in the US in comparison to Switzerland. Same goes for the coffee. However, while coffee in the US might often not be as good as in Switzerland it also costs less per cup as it does in Switzerland.

What else do you think is (too) expensive in Switzerland in comparison to other places you’ve travelled?

Have a great week and talk to you tomorrow! Byeee!

My First Baseball Game: The Report

Hi friends,

long time no see, how are you? I have been enjoying having my friends around me for the last week. We’ve had a wonderful time and I am really thankful for having them in my life, they’re just the BEST. Fortunately, the weather has also been amazing (it’s going to change back to ‘meh’ tomorrow though) so we were able to do cool little roadtrips off to Providence and the Cape (more on that to follow).

In the meantime, one of the dare I say, most interesting experiences of the week was catching a Red Sox game at the iconic Fenway Park.

Thanks again to my former co-workers and team at Publicis who actually gave us those tickets as a gift. Thank you! 

As seeing a baseball game (especially one of the Red Sox) is such an iconic part of Bostonian life I thought that I had to cover it here and tell you a little bit more about it. I feel that we Europeans have NO clue about baseball. So, you ready? Let’s get started!

The Red Sox and Fenway Park

The Red Sox are a baseball team based in Boston that has been founded in 1901 and calls Fenway Park (with its about 38’000 seats) its home ballpark since 1912. The Red Sox’s arch enemy are the Yankees.

The experience and the food

I mean, you’re in America. You’ll have LOTS of food and drinks options everywhere around. We obviously went for Fenway Franks (hot dogs), fries and beer. BTW, they are pretty liberal it seems with the beer consumption in the stadium, which is a nice change to the rather strict alcohol policy in the city.

The preferred sweets (besides all the possible candy you could think of like M&Ms etc.) seemed to be cotton candy and soft ice cream. Fun times. We definitely didn’t starve.

The game

Is baseball possibly the most complicated sport ever? I feel like there are so many statistics and strange rules (that I obviously don’t know) that make it kind of hard to follow. More on that a bit further down below. So. Long story short: I will actually spare you the details on the whole rules and strategy as I personally found it rather boring.

If you really want to know more about it and about all the stats and stuff check this site out (if you’re really serious about itor the corresponding wikipedia entry for a more softer version.

What I can tell you is that (even I understood that) the Red Sox played terribly and lost 10-5 against the Tampa Bay Rays. Info over.

The music

O-M-G. The music. SO. MUCH. fun.

My favorite part besides the snacks and the overall fun atmosphere must have been the music.

I was super surprised to find out that the players are actually allowed to choose their music when they play. And dare I say, it seems that they are big Kanye and Drake fans.

Absolutely go and check the player music out here. It’s so fun (how many times am I going to say that). Still, that’s one thing I find they could take over for soccer games, how funny would that be?

Also, Sweet Caroline by Neil Diamond is an anthem for the Red Sox and of course they played it when we were there, so I had to record it. Loving the couple next to us that is super happy about it and singing along.

Why I kind of don’t like baseball

While I really liked the atmosphere, the food, the music and the people I didn’t leave Fenway park as a new fan. I find that the game itself is quite boring (baseball fans don’t hate me), slow and not creative. It’s the same kind of predictable moves on repeat except that you don’t know if they are going to hit the ball or miss it (which by the way they miss A LOT).

Still, I would warmly recommend it to anyone visiting the city as it is such a unique overall experience sitting in such an old and traditional place like Fenway Park.

Thanks again Publicis Team! And talk to you next week.