Posts in Boston

Wanderlust 108 Boston: The Report

Friends!

How was your weekend? Mine was pretty pretty AH-MA-ZING. Why you ask? Because I kind of met someone really special. I met Adriene. Adriene from Yoga with Adriene. YES,  I know. It was just such a beautiful day. But. Everything in order.

Wanderlust 108 – What it is

Wanderlust 108 is full day celebration in support of the mindful movement, featuring a triathlon consisting of a 5K run, an outdoor yoga flow class, and a guided meditation. Following the triathlon, you can take one scheduled activity, such as acroyoga, walking meditation etc. There are also local vendors offering organic food and crafts, and charitable organizations making an impact in your local community.

Photo: Scarlet Roots

The experience

My buddy Sophie and I started off the 5K along the Charles River feeling strong and motivated, which led me to finish at my PB of around 25 minutes. Thanks for the great vibes, Soph!

We then had a quick wonder around the market, tried some foods, chilled and had a coffee before going to the yoga class that I was looking forward so much to (see further explanation down below as to why I was excited for it). While the morning had been a bit cloudy and fresh the morning and afternoon turned out to be sunny and warm.

Adriene and me (insert heart eyed emoji here)

Awww, where to begin. So first off, if you’ve been around from the veeery early beginnings on you might remember my American Bucket list (if that doesn’t ring a bell, check it out here). I stated in said list that I would love to get a photo with Adriene and if you scroll down you see exactly that. A photo of Adriene and myself. Still can’t believe it. She is genuinely just the nicest person and I want to be her friend.

She did such a good job, she was funny, kind, intelligent and generous. Just an awesome yoga teacher and an even more amazing person in real life.

I was really sweating after all day spent in the sun, running and doing yoga so I think I first apologized to her for being sweaty (cool move, Sandra…NOT). Some ‘how to…not small talk’ insight for you right there.

Do NOT talk about how sweaty you are.

Still, the amazingly kind and warm-hearted person she is, she asked me about my name, how my day was going so far. I must have said something (everything is a bit of a blur to be honest because I was so E-X-C-I-T-E-D). Anyways, that’s boring for you. What I’m trying to get across though, always believe in achieving your goals or dreams, someday they will become a reality. Would I have thought 6 months ago that Adriene would hug my sweaty self? Nope. See?

Wanderlust coming to Europe?

Fellow European readers, I’ve got good news for you. There will be Wanderlust events coming to Switzerland and Europe as well, check all the details out here and be sure to let me know how it went! You’ll enjoy it I’m sure. Let’s go!

Namaste beautiful people!

Why I’m Going to Buy a Harvard Sweater (Even Though I Said I Never Would)

Kids! We’re leaving town. We’re leaving Cambridge.

 

So very sad. I’m surprised at how nostalgic I’m feeling when writing down those words. Leaving this special place after having lived here for one year seems so difficult all of a sudden. It’s just SUCH a nice place to live in, especially in summer. I have to say, Boston and Cambridge are total beauties in the summer time (makes you almost forget how TERRIBLE winter is here). Maybe that’s a trick this city plays on you. Half of the year it’s the most beautiful place ever and you’re like, ‘cool place’, other half of the year….NOT SO MUCH.

Anyways. Why do I like it here so much you ask?

Cambridge has the feeling and vibe of a small town to it (a little more than 100’000 inhabitants, remember? Not that much after all), the houses are BEAUTIFUL, there’s tree-lined little cute streets everywhere. Still there are tons of things to do everyday (events, concerts, theatre plays, the list goes on), there are plenty of cool (is it still ok to use ‘cool’?) bars, cafés, amazing restaurants and little local shops all around the corner.

The mix of people is diverse and fascinating, there are obviously lots of proud Harvard students around, wearing all of the branded gear and clothes making it clear to everyone on the streets passing them WHO is going to Harvard. They are. You are NOT. Unless you’re a cute tourist buying all the Harvard shirts and sweaters from the Harvard store to pass as a student. I’m sorry to break it to you. People will notice YOU’RE NOT AN ORIGINAL. Still, I will buy a Harvard sweater as an emotional souvenir. And still, it’s nice to have so many young people around. There are also lots of families and people that have been living here for a long time. Aw, I’m going to miss you Cambridge, you beautiful town.

I sound very dramatic I realize now that I’ve read through that last paragraph. Because…let’s all not forget that we’re moving to the city…that is 10 minutes away by subway.

Anyways, I’m in a dramatic mood today.

Still, I’m going to miss the first place I ever called a home in the United States, I’ll never forget. And this eclectic and international mix of people. Ok, going to leave you now. It’s getting worse and worse.

Have a great day!

Meet Fernanda, Ly and Mattias (Part 2)

Hi people,

how are you? I guess you must be doing well, as it is F-R-I-D-A-Y! Yay! Happy weekend!

Join me today for the second and final part of the interview I did with the phenomenal trio Ly (Vietnam), Fernanda (Brazil) and Mattias (Sweden). We’re going to talk about adjusting to a life in a new country and looking back on their experience in the US. As applied for part 1 if you’d rather like us hear speaking, click on the corresponding audio files below.

Settling in

Sandra: What was the easiest or the hardest part in adjusting to your new life here in the US?

Fernanda: I’m going to say that the best part of living here is that it is very convenient. Especially living in Cambridge. It has a bit of a small town, suburban feeling to it, still you have Boston close by. You don’t need a car. Also, I really like being able to head down to CVS at 2am in the morning for ice cream. In Rio, shops close very early. On the other hand, things here are very expensive compared to Rio.

Sandra: What do you find to be most expensive, the food, the cost of living?

Fernanda: I wanna say health insurance. It’s painful how much it costs…

Sandra: Yeah, that’s true, I think that both Switzerland and the US are two of the countries within the OECD that pay most for health insurance.

Fernanda: The hardest part was maybe speaking to people. I wasn’t too confident in my English when I first arrived. I’m very shy and have some trouble speaking to people anyway, so talking in another language I don’t feel so comfortable in, was even more challenging for me.

Sandra: What do you miss the most?

Fernanda: Besides my family and friends it has to be the food. I miss being able to go to a café and have something savoury and not always sweet stuff with my coffee for example. I have to do it myself that’s frustrating (laughs). Also, people in Rio are very warm and open and you can basically start a conversation with everyone if you’d like to. It’s not that I particularly like that but now that I’m gone I miss it. Same goes for music. I never used to be into Samba music but for some reason, now that I live abroad, I love it! I listen to it every day to wake up.

Sandra: Does Mattias also listen to Swedish music to wake up?

Mattias: No, not really. Every now and then I will listen to a Swedish jazz orchestra. I don’t do lots of Swedish things I guess. I came here for the American music of course (everyone laughs).

Sandra: Of course. What was the easiest or hardest part for you in settling in here in the US?

Mattias: It was mostly easy to adjust ourselves to the new life here. Having moved a lot and having lived in a lot of countries has influenced us in the sense that there’s only a few basic things we need to buy to make us feel at home.

Sandra: What are those?

Mattias: Something like a good kitchen knife for example, kitchen stuff basically. Back in China and a few other countries it used to be a window scraper. Those are multi tools for getting water away from showers in the bathroom, the kitchen and stuff.

Sandra: Do you have one now?

Mattias: No. In general it’s cooking in a place and then everything will feel at home. That’s how it has been the last couple of times we moved anyway. And in Cambridge everything feels very nice. I really like that it feels like a small place that is connected to a bigger place like Boston. I’d even say that out of all the places I’ve lived I feel most at home here.

Sandra: Why is that? Besides the home cooking.

Mattias: Cambridge kind of feels like the village I am from in the north of Sweden, just bigger. It’s more spread out. The lushness of the trees, the smell of the bushes, how it looks. It kind of reminds me of my hometown that makes me feel a bit nostalgic.

Sandra: What about you, Ly?

Ly: I love to explore new cultures and Boston happens to be such a melting pot of different cultures. So I’ll have Korean food on Monday, Vietnamese on Tuesday, American Food on Wednesday, maybe Swedish next…

Mattias: Swedish fish maybe! (everyone laughs)

Sandra: That’s as Swedish as it can get here (red. Swedish fish is a gummy candy in fish shape, probably not Swedish at all).

Ly: We’ll also have cheese fondue often, even in summer time. We prepare it in our rice cooker.

Sandra: So you like the variety of cultures coming together in one place?

Ly: Yes, that’s right. What I also really like is the wide offer of events and activities in the city. I have pottery and salsa classes, everything is quite close and it’s just so exciting.

Sandra: So you really like the that you find a lot of things to do here.

Ly: What I miss is the Vietnamese language. Maybe because I don’t really hang out with other Vietnamese people. I still text my friends. I also try to listen to more Vietnamese songs. Before coming here, I didn’t like Vietnamese songs too much, they seemed too cheesy and romantic to me. But now I love to listen to them as they make me feel good.

Looking back on the US experience

Sandra: Picture yourself as an old person. If someone were to ask you about your experience in the US, what would you tell them, what would your main take aways be? Let’s start with you Mattias, what would you say as old wise men?

Mattias: How inspiring this is as a place. And how many great people are here and how open they are. They are passionate about what they’re doing and will share that with you. I’ve been also been going to seminars here and people are always so nice. I’d say this is the main take away that is different from other places.

Sandra: What about you, Fernanda?

Fernanda: I think that the biggest lesson I’ve learned is that everybody everywhere in the world is very similar. You don’t have to be afraid to interact with others and start a conversation. It’s fascinating to me how people from different cultures can communicate and talk to each other. They’re just people. And I used to be afraid of that. I have friends from all over the world now and that is something Boston gave to me.

Mattias: That’s the nicest thing I’ve heard so far.

Sandra: That’s so nice. The pressure is on now for you Ly.

Ly: Boston really is kind of a global village. There are people from all over the world here. The diversity is great and it’s just such an exciting and innovative place to be. I also appreciate how open people are and how they will be open to new opportunities as well. They want to make things happen. That’s so different from Vietnam or even the UK. That’s one of the things I like the most, besides living with my husband of course.

Happy weekend everyone!

Meet Fernanda, Ly and Mattias (Part 1)

Hi friends,

I’m keeping the interview mode on until the end of the week and am really happy to share part 1 of an interview I did with three great humans about their own experiences of arriving and living in the United States with you today. Meet Fernanda (Brazil), Mattias (Sweden) and Ly (Vietnam).

Also, if you’re a lazy bum and prefer to listen to the interview instead of reading it (I totally understand, no judgement here), just click on the corresponding audio files below (bonus material included, please excuse the wind in the audio).

The Arrival 

Sandra: Do you remember the day you first arrived to Boston?

Ly: My husband picked me up at the airport and I was just so happy to see him. On our drive back home, I was just amazed by how big it all seemed, especially the buildings and how pretty the light was during that time of day. It was in the evening during the golden hour and the sky had that beautiful purple color, it was so romantic. The next day was a different story though. Without the romantic lighting the buildings just looked like concrete.

Sandra: That’s a nice first impression, what about you, Mattias, as seen from a Swedish perspective?

Mattias: I actually had the opposite experience. It started out really bad and turned out to be a really nice experience.

Sandra: How come?

Mattias: When we decided that we were going to come to Harvard, I had actually no idea where Boston was. I didn’t know it was that far up north. And I read that it rains and snows a lot, which I didn’t know. But I thought, ok, it’s going to be fine. The day we arrived, however, it was raining like crazy.

Sandra: What time of the year was it?

Mattias: The 28th of December.

Sandra: Wow, that’s a hardcore time to arrive here.

Mattias: Everything went well, we came to the apartment that we rented and then we needed to go to the supermarket. So we figured out that the closest shop was something called like Trader Joes. So we started walking there, and there were no sidewalks. Even though now we know that there are sidewalks everywhere, just on that particular patch there was no sidewalk. Then there was this sleet coming down, this mix of rain and snow, it was really cold and we came into Trader Joes and everything was super expensive. We were used to Chinese prices (red. before coming to the US, Mattias and his wife were based in China). But if we’ll go back to Sweden we might think s***, everything is so expensive. So on our first evening here, we didn’t really want to buy anything to eat because it was expensive, we came home totally drenched and cold…

Sandra: Did things get a little better the following day?

Mattias: Yes, the next day everything was a lot better. Blue skies, pretty nice.

Sandra: What about you, Fernanda?

Fernanda: When we got here, about two years ago, it was summer. It was my first time in America during the summer. And I seriously didn’t know it could get this hot. I had this idea in my head of Boston being so far up north that it couldn’t possibly be as hot as in Brazil. So I was a little disappointed in a way.

Sandra: Would you have preferred a crazy winter scenario like Mattias had when arriving here?

Fernanda: Yes, I was a bit disappointed but now I enjoy it especially after having spent two winters here. I’ve really learned to appreciate the seasons, which is pretty cool because we don’t really have changing seasons in Brazil, at least in Rio it’s always very hot. It’s been a while since I first got here and so I don’t really remember every detail anymore. I think we were very excited to be here. We had just gotten married, were living in our first home together and were doing everything together as a married couple for the first time. So it was a really special. And I think I associate this newlywed feeling with Boston. It was a good first impression.

Sandra: And if you think back, when meeting new people, what were people’s reactions when you told them that you were from Brazil?

Fernanda: I remember some people finding it strange that I was so pale. Because they have this idea about Brazilian people, especially from Rio, that they are tanned and enjoy the sun. Speaking of Americans, I can hardly say that I’ve met one. Like everyone that I know isn’t from here. I guess the most American friends that I have are Canadians (everyone laughs).

Sandra: Well I don’t know if they’d like you to say that about them…

Fernanda: It’s just very hard to meet locals.

Sandra: What about you Mattias and Ly? Would they know that it is Sweden and not Switzerland for example?

Mattias: Yeah, exactly that’s what I was going to say.

Sandra: No actually, you always win. It’s Switzerland that people here mostly confuse with Sweden and not the other way round I think.

Mattias: Maybe because you’re a woman. I think Americans associate Sweden somehow with women. But like Fernanda, I have only met very few Americans. When I went to buy fabric recently, they asked me where I was from. And then they said, ‘Ah Sweden’, that’s that tiny country with the nice chocolate.

Sandra: That’s so funny, it’s actually the opposite from what always happens to me. They will always end up meaning Sweden and NOT Switzerland.

Sandra: What about you Ly?

Ly: It’s a bit of a similar experience to Mattias and Fernanda. As Boston is such an international place, I haven’t met that many real Bostonians up until now. Most of the Americans I meet are actually my Uber drivers.

Sandra: Interesting, what about them?

Ly: First off they think I’m from China. But when I say ‘No, I’m from Vietnam’, they’ll say ‘Oh, you’re from Vietnam, I love phở’. I think phở seems to be very popular, so everyone seems to know and like it.

Sandra: That’s so interesting, so the first association people have is with phở.

American Food

Sandra: From the top of your head, what’s your favorite American food or drink item?

Fernanda: (very fast response) Mac and Cheese.

Sandra: That was very fast. Any other foods?

Fernanda: That’s the only American food I’ve discovered. All the other foods I’ve gotten to know here are not American, like Vietnamese food, which I really like.

Sandra: In terms of drinks any favorites?

Fernanda: Well, something I like is that craft beers are a huge thing here. My husband and I are really into it and it’s very easy to find specialty beers.

Sandra: Nobody says doughnuts, I’m so surprised. You don’t like doughnuts?

Ly: No, not really. It’s quite difficult to tell if a food is American because their cuisine has so many influences from different places. I actually really like Avocado toast.

Sandra: That’s very healthy.

Ly: I’m not quite sure if it’s a special dish but I really like it.

Fernanda: I think it started off as an Australian thing.

Ly: I think they put Avocado on everything here.

Sandra: Yeah, it’s trendy.

Ly: And it’s quite surprising for me. Even though we have a lot of avocados in Vietnam too, I never eat in a savoury dish, like on bread or in a salad, we eat it as a sweet. Normally we prepare it with milk and sugar or in a smoothie.

Mattias: I pretty much always eat at home, so I couldn’t say. The most American I do, is that I drink a lot of Diet Coke, which I don’t do otherwise.

Stay tuned for part 2 of the interview where we’ll cover American daily life. It’s a good one.

Have a fantastic Thursday everyone!

My Favorite Cafés in Boston/Cambridge

Hi people,

It’s Friday soon and some of us need a coffee especially on a Friday morning to get things started, right?

I LOVE cafés, there’s just something about them. They are a place where you can stop and take in a moment of reflection and of course enjoy a great cup of coffee, tea as well as beautifully made and (even more importantly) deliciously tasting pastries. Oh YES.

Whether you’ll be visiting the area soon or are a local looking for inspiration, I’ve got you covered. What follows  are my favorite café spots so far (granted I haven’t seen ALL of them yet, I’m still researching. But those six have definitely won a special place in my heart, yes yes).

Have a great cup of coffee and take on that day, ok? Enjoy the weekend! I’m off to Zurich for the next 10 days and am looking forward to a wedding of a beautiful friend of mine, SO E-X-C-I-T-E-D. Hard to spell a word out when your that excited. Anyways, all the best and will talk to you next week!

Loyal Nine

Oh, I love this place. All about it. It’s concept mainly is that they use ingredients and create dishes that the settler a few (!) years back would have cooked with. I love Loyal Nine at every time of day, in the morning the café annex next to the restaurant is a lovely option with great coffee and tea as well as great and creative café food. If you want to go all out, I’d recommend you try the Brunch on the weekend (go for the bread pancakes, absolutely delicious) or dinner. Loyal Nine will not disappoint, it’s one of those restaurants where you leave with a happy belly, not feeling overeaten. The drinks are amazing, too. Can you tell that I like Loyal Nine?

Tatte Bakery

I couldn’t do a favorites list without including Tatte. It’s just…Fantastic! Friends and family who came to visit can attest, it’s a pastries heaven for anyone looking for a delicious sweet or savory breakfast. Seriously their display in the morning is just, unbelievable. They have grown quite a bit in the last time and now have various branches all over the city, definitely check them out if you ever wanted to try super delicious chocolat croissants, pecan nut roses, lemon tarts, meringue, halvas, kouign-ammans and the list goes on. They really know their stuff.

Thinking Cup

Thinking Cup seriously convinced me with their coffee in the first place. They use Stumptown Coffee (remember, that was the coffee I drank in New York that I loved so much). It’s actually seriously the best coffee I’ve ever drank, no doubt.

Longfellows

A brewery at night, a coffee shop in the daytime. I love Longfellows if I want to get a productive working morning or afternoon in. It’s a place to get good coffee and get on your laptop. There’s just this peaceful atmosphere that I love. Also, the chairs are #goals!

Pavement Coffee

I especially love the Pavement café on Newbury Street, as it is tucked away a little in the underground and you kind of have to know where it is. Nonetheless, quite a few people know about it, as it is ALWAYS full. But hey, I get it, pretty decors, chill atmosphere and good coffee. Yep, it’s a cool place.

Flour Bakery 

Hands-down the best sandwiches. If you ever feel hungry, check Flour Bakery out. The Harvard graduate Joanne Chang has opened a few branches since opening up her first one here in Harvard Square. And yeah, those sandwiches are just, wow.

What are your favorite cafés in the place you live? Have a fantastic weekend!

A Bike Ride To A Not So Normal Pond

Hi people,

yesterday summer temperatures hit Boston and Cambridge so I thought it’d be the perfect opportunity to bring my bike out for a ride. I chose Waldon Pond (Concord, Massachusetts) as my destination. 29,2 miles (aka 46,9 km).

In short: I sweat a lot.

But it was definitely worth it. It’s so nice to know that within a few minutes I get to see so many nice little towns and nature. So, a few words about Waldon Pond. As it is not your regular pond. Why you ask?

Let’s start with a few points on Transcendentalism (as Wikipedia tells us)

What it is: It’s a philosophical movement that developed in the late 1820s in the eastern part of the United States. It arose as a reaction against the general state of intellectualism and spirituality. A core belief of transcendentalism is in the inherent goodness of people and nature. Adherents believe that society and its institutions have corrupted the purity of the individual, and they have faith that people are at their best when truly “self-reliant” and independent.

An experiment on self-reliance

Hentry David Thoreau, a transcendentalist of the time, published a book named Walden where he reflects on simple living in natural surroundings. In order to fully live a simple life, be independent and self-reliant, he built a cabin near Waldon Pond and lived in it for a bit over two years on his own. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and (to some degree) manual for self-reliance. Interesting, isn’t it? Could you picture yourself living in a cabin all alone for two years?

The paranormal pond if you will

 The Bike Ride (and mostly pretty houses)

American Events: The Boston Marathon

Hi everyone, wassup?

I think I might have found out what seems to be the most important sports event in the Bostonian calendar (besides Super Bowl): The Boston Marathon. It’s a holiday actually as the race is held on Patriot’s Day. Ergo: People are happy to have a day off and use it to join the celebrations in the city. It’s a huge party in other words!

Reasons enough to share little bits and bobs about its history with you today as it will be happening next Monday.

How it all started and why the race is always on a Monday

John Graham, who was inspired by the marathon at the first modern Olympic Games in Athens in 1896, wanted to have a marathon in Boston, too. With the help of a friend, he planned out a route throughout the city and its surroundings and got started. The first marathon took place on April 19, 1897.

Fifteen runners started the race but only 10 made it to the finish line. Oops.

Originally, the Boston Marathon was held on Patriot’s Day, April 19, a regional holiday that commemorates the beginning of the Revolutionary War. In 1969, Patriots Day was officially moved to the third Monday in April and the race has been held on that Monday ever since.

The first woman running the marathon (as a man)…

Women were not allowed to enter the Boston race officially until 1972 (what, booh), but Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb couldn’t wait: In 1966, she became the first woman to run the entire Boston Marathon, but had to hide in the bushes near the start until the race began. In 1967, Kathrine Switzer, who had registered as “K. V. Switzer”, was the first woman to run with a race number. Switzer finished even though officials tried to physically remove her from the race after she was identified as a woman.

Only in 1971 were women allowed to enter in the marathon. One year after that, Nina Kuscsik became the first official female participant to win the Boston Marathon.

The bombings in 2013

On April 15, 2013, two bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three spectators and wounding more than 260 other people. Four days later, the police captured 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, whose older brother and fellow suspect, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died following a shootout with law enforcement earlier that same day. Tsarnaev was found guilty in 2015 of helping carry out the attack, as well as fatally shooting a policeman and was sentenced to death.

Why Boston/Cambridge Is a Great Place for Curious People

Hello everyone

I want to talk about curiosity today.

It’s something I’ve been thinking about lately, especially since having moved to Boston/Cambridge. I think that it is a great place to live if you are a curious person and appreciate being surrounded by an innovative and intellectually inspiring environment. Why that is you ask? Find out more below:

The “Athens of America”

Boston got this nickname due to its over 100 educational facilities and its big teaching and student population. Also, many of the universities and colleges (e.g. Harvard University or MIT) are considered amongst the best in the world.

Students EVERYWHERE (making me feel old, thanks)

With over 250,000 college students living within Boston/Cambridge, they account for 1/3rd of the total population. In other words, lots of young people around (making me feel old, not cool. Happy for them of course. But still.)

A City of Book Lovers and Book Stores

Although the Library of Congress contains the most volumes in the whole country (more than 29,550,000), Harvard University’s Library is second with more than 15,000,000 and the Boston Public Library is third with more than 14,000,000. So many books, right? Also, there are SO MANY book stores especially in Cambridge with lots of events going on all the time. Take the Harvard Book Store for example, alone in the month of April it will be holding 27 events, amongst them with world-known authors, professors or personalities such as Sheryl Sandberg, Noam Chomsky to name a few.

The startup scene is going strong

With nearly 2,000 startups in all possible fields ((bio)technology, medical, etc.) the city is considered a world leader in innovation and entrepreneurship and rightly so. I’ve already met quite a few people (when I did small talk. Because that’s a way to learn things. Also a great way to “use” your curiosity as it is considered acceptable to ask lots of questions when doing small talk. Ok, long excursus over) telling me about amazing start ups they were working for. One girl (I sadly don’t remember the name of the organization) was working in a startup that was developing a tool that prevents people from dying from internal bleeding that could be used in war but also first aid situations, which I thought was really interesting (I’m sure I’ve done a terrible job at explaining as it was quite medical but the essence is, people do interesting stuff here).

Talks and Presentations to choose from everyday

One of the things that I enjoy the most here is the vast array and choice of presentations, talks and conferences you can attend literally EVERY day. If you wanted you could spend days only visiting MIT and Harvard public lectures (just to name two that I’ve gotten to know a bit better, there are tons of other colleges/institutes with their own stuff too).

It’s seriously a privilege being able to listen to so many intelligent and inspiring people that come to those institutions. So far, I’ve seen the mayor of the City of Boston talk about urban planning and the city’s future development, the mayor of Mexico City (a lot of mayors I know realize) giving a lecture on urban challenges and climate change or attended a conference on everyday feminism at Harvard Law School. I’ve seen Noam Chomsky and former Foreign Secretary of the UK, Mr. Straw talking about Brexit and Trump at MIT. It’s been super interesting and rewarding having the time to actually go to those lectures.

Today’s take away for you

If today’s post has a take away it should be that I’d encourage you to check out if the universities or other institutions in your city offer public talks and presentations that you could attend (if you’re interested in the topic that is).

For all of my Boston located friends who aren’t already familiar with those links, you’ll find the events calendars of Harvard University and MIT below.

Have a lovely day and remember:

A life without curiosity is quite simply a boring life.

How to Talk like a Bostonian

It was time I talked about the Boston accent.

This is an interesting one. It is an accent that is recognized all over the country and is often (badly) imitated in movies and series. Or made fun of.

How come?

It is very unique and has been influenced by the early settlers as well as the different immigrant groups, like the Irish and Italians. Up to this day, you’ll find neighborhood differences based on the predominant immigrant groups that used to live there.
There is also a more elite version of the Boston accent, called Brahmin, which for example former President John F. Kennedy used to speak. Check out a speech here, if you want to have a listen.

Mini Guide on how to talk like a (wannabe) Bostonian

Three points to take away regarding that accent before you click on (by no means is this a comprehensive guide to talking like a proper Bostonian, just a few points, don’t want to overdo it. However, if you’re a passionate  linguist or just intrigued by this interesting accent, read more about it in this wikihow article. Again, a very entertaining source of information):

  • Drop the “r”: The following example phrase is very famous and often used to underline this principle: A real Bostonian would pronounce the phrase Park your car in Harvard Yard like this: Pahk Yuh Cahr in Hahvuhd Yahd. Perfect moment to click on the third video now as you’ll hear this exact sentence.
  • Use slang: Put the word wicked before anything if you like something. For example, your favorite singer performs wicked good. They’ll know you’re from Boston INSTANTLY.
  • Say the letter “a” right: For example, add an “r” to the end of words that end in “a.”  Matt Damon shows you how to do it:

And because Matt Damon was so brilliant in Good Will Hunting AND talks some fine Southie (form of Bostonian) in it, let us go back. Watch out for the final phrase.

The following two are funny videos produced by the Boston Globe where a reporter confronts his father and his VERY STRONG ACCENT with Siri (spoiler alert, she has some trouble understanding him…) as well as a class where locals are trained to loose their accent and speak “neutral” English. See if you spot some of the points mentioned above.